Explain the composition of a High Court

The Constitution provides for a High Court for each State. Parliament may, however, establish a common High Court for two or more States/Union Territories. This depends on the area and the population to which a High Court has to serve and the amount of work it has to handle. There are 21 High Courts in India. Delhi is the only union territory that has a High Court of its own. The composition of a High Court is discussed below

Composition of a High Court

Each High Court consists of a Chief Justice and such other Judges as the President of India may appoint from time to time. Besides, the President has the power to appoint:

(i) Additional Judges for a temporary period not exceeding two years, for the clearance of arrears of work in a High Court;

(ii) an acting Judge when a permanent Judge (other than the Chief Justice) is temporarily absent or unable to perform his duties or is appointed to act temporarily as Chief Justice. The acting Judge holds office until the permanent Judge resumes his office.


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